How to Hang a Hammock in 3 Simple Steps

Hanging your hammock can seem complicated and overwhelming.

All you want to do is relax in your cozy new hammock but you’re worried that you’re going to pick the wrong spot, position, or end up uncomfortable and constantly adjusting.

Luckily for you, it's a lot easier than you think once you know what you’re doing. But, it’s important to remember…

you need to make sure you hang a hammock correctly in order to reach the full potential of its comfort and relaxation.

Whether you recently bought a new hammock or are planning on getting one soon for the warm weather, properly hanging it will make all the difference with the level of satisfaction you experience.

So, without further ado, let’s get your hammock set up so you can start enjoying the nice weather!

Hanging a Hammock is Easy as 1, 2, 3

1. Choose Your Desired Location

Choosing a location to hang your hammock may seem like an easy step, but it’s usually the most difficult part.

While you probably don’t have perfectly spaced palm trees on a warm tropical beach in your backyard (and if you do, we are very jealous), there are still many options when hanging a hammock for your specific layout.

Three of the most common and reliable outdoor areas include:

  • Hang a Hammock from Trees

These can include mature oak, maple, beech, or any other hardwood tree.

Hanging a hammock from trees in a forest.

 

  • On the Porch or Balcony

For those who have this option, ensure that the beams or poles are secure and sturdy.

Decorative Mayan hammock hanging from beams on the front porch.

  • Between Posts

This is the most flexible option if you don’t have trees or a porch. Simply buy two hardwood posts from your local department store and place them wherever you’d like in your yard.

Once you picked your next favorite hangout spot for your hammock, it’s time to determine the exact measurements that will allow you to reach the full comfort potential of your hammock.

2. Calculate and Measure the Correct Distance to Hang Your Hammock

If you’re worried about calculating and determining the exact distances and angles to achieve ultimate relaxation, don’t worry…

you don’t have to be an architect, scientist, or mathematician in order to hang your hammock.

In fact, we’re going to make it easy for you, so your measurement process is a breeze.

Once you become a hammock hanging pro you’ll be able to eyeball the correct distances and angles, but for any newbies or people who like visuals, we suggest using Hanna Pamela’s Hammock Hang Calculator.

Hammock hang calculator used to determine the exact measurements to hang a hammock.

This tool is a great resource that automatically calculates your exact measurements for your specific situation. Simply enter the following information and your measurements will auto calculate:

  • Distance Between Anchors

The distance between the two trees, poles, or beams you are using to hang a hammock. This should be longer than your hammock length.

  • Preferred Sit Height

We recommend a sit height of 18 inches to ensure you are far enough off the ground, so your back isn’t hitting the ground.

  • Weight in Hammock

How much you weigh or the combined weight if you are using this as a two-person hammock.

  • Hammock Length

The total length of your hammock bed, not including hanging ropes.

Also, the general rule of thumb is to use a hanging angle of 30 degrees, while ensuring you're hanging loose with enough tension that your back isn’t hitting the ground.

3. Select Your Hanging Technique & Tools

With so many different types of hanging methods, it can be overwhelming and confusing to know which is the right technique for you.

We understand how you feel, and that is why we’re going to explain in-depth each hanging method so you can choose the best technique for your hammock.

  • Tree Straps

The biggest advantage to using tree straps is how easy and flexible they are.

Hammock tree straps allow you to easily adjust your hanging distance, without having to restart the hanging process all over again. They also won’t harm trees and are portable, making them ideal for camping.

Hammock tree straps used to hang a hammock from a tree.

  • Hammock Hardware

If you’re looking for a permanent hanging option in your backyard or porch, using hanging hardware is the way to go.

The preferred hardware to use for a hammock hanging kit includes 2 eye bolts with hooks, 2 S-hooks, and 2 pieces of chain. Using this type of hardware allows you to easily adjust in order to find the right tension, but the biggest downside is the harm and damage it can do to trees.

Hang hardware kit used to hang a hammock from trees.

  • Hang a Hammock with Rope

Looking for a more traditional method to hang a hammock? The classic rope knot is the perfect option for you.

Rope is portable, lightweight, and another great option if you are constantly traveling with your hammock. However, be aware that using a rope knot takes practice and skill, making this the most difficult hanging technique to master.

  • Hammock Stand

Finally, we have the hammock stand. Ideal for backyards, patios, or decks, these stands are easy to set up and feature many attractive designs for your specific style.

Although they are not practical for camping or traveling, hammock stands still offer many versatile options in your outdoor space, especially if you don’t have any trees or poles to hang from.

Hammock with a wooden stand in the yard.

It’s Time to Hang Your Hammock!

You picked your perfect hammock location, you have the measurements using the hammock hang calculator, and you have chosen your hanging technique. So, what’s next?

Now it’s time to go outside, hang your hammock, and start experiencing supreme comfort and relaxation.

Still looking for a hammock to hang? Make sure to check out our large and premier hammock collection.

We would also love to hear about your unique hammock setup so make sure to leave a comment and pictures below!

Hammocks

1 comment

STEVE

I live in an area in north Florida with fairly stable soil. As far as building a hammock stand, what are the requirements to build a stand that will withstand the lateral forces?

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